Saturday, June 30, 2012

Frankenstein made front cover of Audio Express for June 2012, 2nd month in a row


Be sure to check out the June edition of Audio Express Magazine!

Here you can read a detailed technical explanation of the power amplifiers used in the all-tube home theater system that my friends in college called 'Frankenstein.'

Hopefully there will be more power amplifiers of similar design or at least leveraging some of what was used here.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

We want to learn about your latest phased array system: CFP 2013 IEEE Intl. Symposium on Phased Array Sys. & Tech



During recent decades, phased array systems have made major steps forward with the development of many major radar and communications systems. due to many recent advances, including MMIC, photonics, and digital beamforming, phased array systems and technology continue to progress rapidly. Current and future developments of ground-based, sea-based, airborne, and space-based phased array radar, communications, and other electronic systems will be discussed at this international symposium.

Phased Array 2013, the 5th IEEE international symposium presenting advanced in phased array systems and technologies, will be held at the Westin Hotel, Waltham, Massachusetts on Boston’s famous Route 128.

Poster Presentations

Student Paper Competition

Special Sessions



Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Make your own phased array radar in 5 days, an MIT Short Course Offering





Are you interested in learning about phased array radar systems by building and testing your own?
MIT Professional Education is offering a unique course in the design, fabrication, and test of a laptop-based digital phased array radar sensor capable of ground moving target imaging (GMTI). Lectures will be presented on the topics of applied electromagnetics, antennas, RF design, analog circuits, radar system modeling, and digital signal processing while at the same time you build your own phased array radar system and perform field experiments. Each student will receive a radar kit, designed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory staff, and a course pack.

Monday, June 25, 2012

MIT Embedded Systems Final Project: Doppler Radar System using a coffee can radar




This work was done by Timur Balbekov.  It is the first time i have seen an embedded controller displaying doppler information in real-time using the coffee can radar.

Nice work Timur!

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Fun restoring a Hebe 17J vintage men's wrist watch, very tiny!




Men's wrist watches were much smaller in the past.  This is a Hebe 17J swiss made vintage wrist watch, not sure what year but my guess would be late 50's or early 60's.

Had some interesting difficulties with this.  For one, it is much smaller than working on pocket watches.  Secondly, the hair spring came loose from the balance arbor.  I had to re-mount this very carefully using my tweezers because i do not have a staking set yet.  Amazingly enough this repair worked and this watch keeps excellent time!

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Only a few openings left, sing up now: MIT Build a Radar Short Course




COURSE SUMMARY

Are you interested in learning about radar by building and testing your own imaging radar system?
MIT Professional Education is offering a course in the design, fabrication, and test of a laptop-based radar sensor capable of measuring Doppler and range and forming synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery. Lectures will be presented on the topics of applied electromagnetics, antennas, RF design, analog circuits, and digital signal processing while at the same time you build your own radar system and perform field experiments. Each student will receive a radar kit, designed by MIT Lincoln Laboratory staff, and a course pack.

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

My first Waltham Riverside pocket watch, cleaning and restoration




The watch case was not in the best condition but the movement was serviceable.  I am very happy with how this watch turned out, it is very enjoyable to watch this one run!

Monday, June 4, 2012

Saturday, June 2, 2012

A fascinating book on the subject of engineering: How Apollo Flew to the Moon


Most books on Apollo tend to be about the people, politics, and historical context.  But this book was written for us engineers who want to learn about the systems, science, and physics behind the moon landings:


I'm currently about half-way through this book.  It is fascinating!  I highly recommend.